Alo and De Speak Tone








Alo and De Speak Tone #92


Alo and De Speak Tone

(PD) Alo and De Lake on Land.

Larry Neal Gowdy

Copyright ©2018 December 19, 2018



Emma: Thank you everyone for the warm welcome.

Morning Dove: Emma is our liaison between the elders and the people leasing our lands. Having one person for the people to talk to, helps to prevent unnecessary interruptions of our own lives.

Emma: I rarely do much except maybe answer a few questions once a week or so, but now that I am retired from working, it gives me something interesting to do. Normally I have no problem talking to people, but recently I had a brief conversation with a land person; the man spoke with a very heavy east accent, and spoke very fast. I am accustomed to hearing different accents and speeds of words, but this man's song of emotions disturbed me and made me feel very uncomfortable. The man seems to be a nice enough fellow, but the rhythms and patterns of words were up and down, up and down fast; I had a hard time retaining attention to what he was trying to say. My question is to ask if it was me that was making a mistake of feeling uncomfortable, or if the mistake was the man's.

Yan: I am familiar with the accent you described... it is a cultural accent, very common for the people, and very much accepted by the people as being normal... there is no blame for the people having chosen their accent, but, the accent mirrors the culture... different cultures have different accents, because, different cultures have different environments... children are born and raised in the environments... the children's minds develop within and upon the environments... the differences of accents, are like the songs and spirit of each culture... it is natural, and expected, that no two songs can be the same. I would guess that the man likely exhibited an uncomfortableness of hearing your accent as well...

Emma: Yes he did, I could see it in his eyes and face. We were both polite and patient with each other, but it was not easy to communicate without being tense and distracted by accents.

Yan: When I visited other nations, I learned to explain to other people, early in a conversation, that my accent is slow, and I would also apologize for any discomfort that the people might feel... to first explain, and to then accept responsibility for one's own words, it enabled the listener to feel more comfortable, to not feel cornered... we could then more comfortably speak to each other without raising a sense of defensiveness...

Emma: Good point, I will remember to do that the next time I speak to the man. But another thing in the man's voice was a peculiar tone of untruths. I interpreted the tone to just be his way of speaking the modern language as a second language, but the tone did still have strong evidence of the man not speaking a sincere truth.

Yan: What you described is similar to what I also had experienced... speaking a second language, the choices of the second language are not of the same rhythms as the person's native language... the modern words will be heard to be more sharply dishonest, because, the words are indeed not what the person feels is most correct. Like, change the word 'lake' to the word 'shoe'... each time you want to speak of the lake, you would have to pause, and choose a word that you do not believe is the right word... the tones of dishonesty increase... not really a blame, more just a nature of words... no word is fully honest anyway...

Emma: Ah yes, that makes sense. The main thing then is that I grasp a reason of why the man's words sound dishonest, and then our conversation can be less stressful for both of us.

Yan: I agree... to not know to give lenience, a person's words can cause a lot of harm, but... if the person is from one's own culture, then less lenience should be given... hard for me to explain, but, accents within one's own culture and one's own language, there ought not be a need for lenience...

Alo: I believe, what Yan is pointing to, is that spoken words outwardly express one's inner emotions, and, words heard then inwardly influence one's own inner emotions... the words themselves have relatively little importance... the importance, is the tone of voice... and, how the tone affects the listener...



Yan: Yes, that was what I could not find words for... regardless of accuracy of chosen words, still the tone ought to be gentle, and not merely say the word 'gentle'...

Emma: There, that is one of the problems; the man repeatedly said words like 'kind' and 'please', but there was no heart behind the words. To me, it seemed to make no difference of whether the words were true or not, the thing that bothered me most was that the words did not reflect the person's heart. To me, it seemed as though the man had simply memorized the words and then recited the words as if it were a customary way of speaking.

Yan: You were likely not incorrect... some cultures have a system of belief, that teach people to say specific words... the teachings say to speak words that are polite... not speak lies, not speak rude words, not gossip... to say words that are supposed to create harmony, but the teachings say nothing of the heart, nor of what harmony is... the people, merely follow the teaching's words... the people recite the words, but not tone the words with what the words mean. Similar can be found in all systems of belief... each system of belief has its own special words to recite, over and over... but still, the tones of voice still describe the person's heart...

Emma: Yes there, the word 'kind' was spoken selfishly, as if his speaking the word ought to make me feel obligated to become his servant. To me it was highly offensive.

Yan: The man's culture, has a caste system... it is normal for people in the culture to look down on the lower servant caste... although all cultures, except ours, have a similar system of social castes, the man's culture is very, thick... intentionally or not, his environment helped teach him to behave similarly...

Alo: The same teaching, also claims to have love, compassion, peace... but the teachers themselves have none, which is obvious, because the teachers believe that there can only be one kind of love, one kind of compassion, one kind of peace, one kind of happiness... a destructive teaching, built upon a destructive culture... the result, is heard... the hearing, also destructive...

Emma: Is it merely culture and teachings? What of our own culture? Does ours have a similar fault?

Alo: Different... the man's voice, learned from teachings and culture... our culture, learned from people's voices... our voices, learned from Nature... we observe how different tones influence the body, mind, emotions, and heart... we learn from Nature how to be inwardly good, we choose to be outwardly good by speaking tones that harmonize with Nature's way... proper tones, enable harmony between people... proper tones do not offend, do not harm... but, if an outsider's heart is bad, then good tones will still be received wrong... outsiders often interpret gentle words as the sounds of easy prey... the outsiders then attack, like dogs attacking a gentle rabbit... and, so, it all boils down to each individual's own heart... and, it also boils down to the reality, that, if, people sincerely do wish for harmony amongst all humans, then the people must choose a common ground to base their own hearts... and, the only possible common ground, is Nature's way...

Yan: Precisely... attempting to build harmony within a disharmonious culture, is illogical, and, simply does not work... evidence of not working, is found within the culture's teachings...

Alo: Yes... choose the only unchangeable standard... Nature... choose harmony with the unchangeable standard... all else will self-create...

Yan: And right there explains where the teaching went wrong... the teaching focused on releasing misery, but the teaching never noticed that the misery was the culture itself... the teaching was upside-down... again proved that the teachers did not know what they were teaching...

Alo: Emma, we usually refrain from openly speaking about outsiders' systems of belief, but, it is important to speak when warning a person about dangers... recognize the teachings' mistakes... observe the self-delusions of those who follow the teachings... learn from firsthand experience... and then know to be cautious when near outsiders... remain with harmony, with that which is worthy of harmony... not harm heart on that which is unworthy... one master, many students... perhaps the first master was honorable, but students, perhaps not... just because a man claims to follow a teaching, his voice tone will always remain the judge of his own heart...